Saturday, November 22, 2008

Blooming November at home

dat ain't no flower dere!

de enemy number one stealing my fish

cassia

deep pink mussaenda

Singapore plumeria smells like jasmine

yellow oxalis (oxalis spiralis) makes a great border

yellow oxalis (only found in the Caribbean and Hawaii)

red rose

champagne yellow roses

blue Iris

Desert Rose (adenium)

pink cane begonia (edible flower)

Martinique cuphea

bleeding heart (clerodendrum)

8 comments:

  1. Very pretty display of flowers, Helen. Is that a green heron stealing your fish? I do love the way you have those ponds raised and I like the way you joined them with the pergola (I saw in another post). Very inviting. I think your idea of serving tea in the daytime will be perfect.
    Meems

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  2. Thank you Meems, the ponds were built like that to keep all the toads out. They make a mess with tadpoles and wreck the lilies. Poor toad no one likes him even though he is useful in the garden. Yes that is a green heron who comes for his meals. I have trained one of my dogs to chase him away. I just shout in a shrill voice "GET THE BIRD DIPPY!!" and Dippy comes pelting out of the house to the pond or to where am pointing to. Most of the time she gets it right. The Heron sqawks angrily and flies away.

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  3. i envy your garden:)... here, except for the conifers and few plants, everything has lost their leaves... i love your desert rose and singapore plumeria...

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  4. casabear@gmail.comSunday, November 30, 2008

    We live in Mazatlan & we're trying to replace a few plants on our property. I've noticed these beautiful plants around & being from Canada, had no idea what they were. Someone told me Mussenda ..& thanks to your site...I know that's what they are!!! Having an actual name should help in my quest to locate them. Do they require any special care?

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  5. I have them planted where they get sun up to midday in a sheltered spot. I find that they do not like a windy situation. They are very drought tolerant when established. They are propagated by air layering.

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  6. Helen, I'm fascinated by your lily ponds. How deep are they?
    Have you kept them separate by the colour of the water lilies? How clever! Like a watery flower bed.
    Thanks for stopping by my blog ... and no, I dont think you were ranting. People do need to get out of their comfort zone and interact. Sadly, in this case I think the problem goes much deeper. Its time we had some peace in this region!

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  7. Sunita the ponds are 2 1/2ft deep and the lilies just happen to be growing as they are without planning the colour scheme. In fact a pond is a flower bed in water.

    Yes Sunita I cry on the inside when I read and hear about the violence in you region. One day soon I hope people will give peace a chance.

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  8. Thanks for your comments, Helen. I really enjoyed surfing your blog.

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